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How to switch from sRGB to adobeRGB?

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Post time: 2015-7-10 17:34:34 |Show all posts
I only have basic understanding of monitor calibration and profiling.
Right now I have my monitor, photoshop, etc set up to use sRGB colorspace.
However, since my monitor (dell U3011) can display more colors than sRGB, I want to switch to adobeRGB color space so I can see the additional colors.
What do I have to change to do this?
Do I
(1) change the monitor's color space from sRGB to adobeRGB, using the buttons on the monitor itself?
(2) recalibrate and profile the monitor? But the software (coloreyes display pro) never asks whether I want sRGB or adobeRGB. So how would it know what colorspace I want?
(3) change photoshop color settings->working space RGB to use the new cms file output from step (2)?

Post time: 2015-7-11 04:23:59 |Show all posts
RGBCMYK wrote:
DavidF wrote:
I don't necessarily agree. In most cases I think its better to start with an Adobe rgb file, but if you covert an sRGB file to adobe, and then make adjustments in Photoshop such as levels, curves' hue and satiation, they will all take place in--and benefit somewhat from being in--the adobe rgb color space.
RGBCMYK wrote:
Remember your older files if they have been converted into sRGB will not benefit by converting them into Adobe RGB
How do you think your sRGB files will change when moved into the Adobe RGB color space? Once the colors of you file have been rendered into the smaller srgb color space all out of gamut information is moved into the srgb color space according to your rendering intent and nothing is left outside of the srgb color space. Once converted into srgb your file will be identical whether in srgb or Adobe RGB. If moving a srgb file into Adobe RGB helped anything than why not take it back out to the even larger ProPhoto color space? Think of a balloon and once you let the air out you are left with what is inside the balloon only.
I don’t understand your balloon analogy at all, but I think that the point was that even though converting and image from sRGB to a larger space may not seem like a good idea at first glance, there are times where it is a good idea; in this case for editing.
There is no reason to convert to a larger color space for printing. And though unusual, converting to a larger space can cause problems. You could, for example, have two or more different triples in sRGB map to a singular triple in the wider space – posterization. Hence the importance of using a higher bit depth for larger color spaces; and the reason why it isn’t such a good idea to be doing it with jpegs, which are limited to 8 bits per channel.
I don’t see what rendering intents have to do with it. I know of no current software that uses anything but relative colorimetric for color space to color space conversions.
Brian A

Post time: 2015-7-11 02:58:02 |Show all posts
DavidF wrote:
I don't necessarily agree. In most cases I think its better to start with an Adobe rgb file, but if you covert an sRGB file to adobe, and then make adjustments in Photoshop such as levels, curves' hue and satiation, they will all take place in--and benefit somewhat from being in--the adobe rgb color space.
RGBCMYK wrote:
Remember your older files if they have been converted into sRGB will not benefit by converting them into Adobe RGB
How do you think your sRGB files will change when moved into the Adobe RGB color space? Once the colors of you file have been rendered into the smaller srgb color space all out of gamut information is moved into the srgb color space according to your rendering intent and nothing is left outside of the srgb color space. Once converted into srgb your file will be identical whether in srgb or Adobe RGB. If moving a srgb file into Adobe RGB helped anything than why not take it back out to the even larger ProPhoto color space? Think of a balloon and once you let the air out you are left with what is inside the balloon only.
-- hide signature --www.christopherbroughton.com

Post time: 2015-7-11 01:42:11 |Show all posts
I don't necessarily agree. In most cases I think its better to start with an Adobe rgb file, but if you covert an sRGB file to adobe, and then make adjustments in Photoshop such as levels, curves' hue and satiation, they will all take place in--and benefit somewhat from being in--the adobe rgb color space.
RGBCMYK wrote:
Remember your older files if they have been converted into sRGB will not benefit by converting them into Adobe RGB

Post time: 2015-7-11 00:10:52 |Show all posts
Howard Moftich wrote:
ColorEyes will measure and profile the monitor to it's own unique color space which will be greater than sRGB but slightly smaller than aRGB. The profile it creates is used by applications to map the colors.
Yes, you really want the monitor using it native space.
Brian A.

Post time: 2015-7-10 22:54:50 |Show all posts
Remember your older files if they have been converted into sRGB will not benefit by converting them into Adobe RGB.  Think of a balloon and this is your Adobe RGB color space and going to sRGB lets air out of the balloon and once the air is gone you are left with what you have inside the smaller space.  If you shoot RAW you can just reprocess your files into your new space but if the files have been converted into sRGB only your future files will benefit from your new larger space.
-- hide signature --www.christopherbroughton.com

Post time: 2015-7-10 21:11:40 |Show all posts
ColorEyes will measure and profile the monitor to it's own unique color space which will be greater than sRGB but slightly smaller than aRGB.  The profile it creates is used by applications to map the colors.

Post time: 2015-7-10 19:26:49 |Show all posts
I suspect that for the monitor, you'd just switch it to Adobe rgb color space, then you might want to recalibrate the monitor - if your device for calibration doesn't ask about the color space, I wouldn't worry about it.
The other side of the equation are the image files your viewing. They may already be in the Adobe color space, but if not, you can convert them in photoshop--though I don't have the instructions to do that available right now.
Keep in mind that changing to a wider color space doesn't by itself change the colors or add to the number of colors in a particular image file. But if you then make adjustments, you'll be doing so in the larger color space.
Also keep in mind that the internet and browsers only 'see' in sRGB, so the general rule is you should convert images to sRGB if they're for web viewing. Adobe rgb files are great for inkjet printing however.
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